This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

Common Forensic Neuropsychological Evaluation Questions

Home/forensic neuropsychologist, forensic neuropsychologist Charlotte NC/Common Forensic Neuropsychological Evaluation Questions

Evaluations for the court system have a different intent than routine clinical evaluations.  The latter tend to focus more on diagnosis and treatment needs/planning, whereas forensic neuropsychological evaluations have a very different cope.  Forensic neuropsychological evaluations are requested by the court system, or by attorneys, in many cases.  Instead, the third party that referred the individual, such as the attorney, owns the record and work product and this is submitted for court/juror review.  Forensic neuropsychological evaluations for the court system can address the following common questions:

  • Did the individual have diminished capacity at the time of the offense? Was s/he of sound mind at the time of the offense?
  • Was the individual capable of forming intent at the time the offense occurred?
  • Was the individual competent to have waived his or her rights under Miranda?
  • Was the individual competent to have made changes to a will, medical directives, a retirement portfolio, or to have entered into a legal agreement?
  • Is the individual currently competent to stand trial, to assist his or her attorneys with her defense, does s/he understand court proceedings?
  • Was s/he competent to have made changes to a will, medical directives, a retirement portfolio, or to have entered into a legal contract?
  • What is the cause of the plaintiff’s disorder?
  • What other factors (outside of injury) have prolonged or led to exacerbations and fluctuations in the plaintiff’s symptoms? If there is preexisting evidence of the same type of problems, have the plaintiff’s symptoms been aggravated by the injury?
  • Would the plaintiff have required the same level of care but for the injury, or, would we have expected the plaintiff to require this level of care regardless of whether the injury occurred, based on empirical data?
  • Is the person permanently disabled under the legal definition?
  • Does the person have a credible presentation, and is this corroborated through testing, observation, and collateral data?
  • Can malingering or symptom exaggeration (intentional or unintentional) be ruled in or ruled out? Forensic neuropsychological testing can be of great benefit here!
  • Are there mitigating or aggravating factors to consider at sentencing?
  • Does the individual pose a recidivism risk or a risk for violence within the community or institution? What is his or her prognosis?

 

About the Author:

Dr. Messler is a board certified clinical neuropsychologist and licensed psychologist who has provided thousands of evaluations where the question of traumatic brain injury was raised. She has also served as expert consultant and witness. She believes it is critical to provide an objective, scientifically defensible opinion, and to help the jury and court understand the implications of the neuropsychological aspects of cases before them. As a prior active duty neuropsychologist, she has extensive experience in the area of military forensic neuropsychology.